7 Common Diseases Of Beans Plantation And How To Treat - Agrolearner.com
Common Diseases Of Beans

7 Common Diseases Of Beans Plantation And How To Treat

Beans is one of the highly consumed agricultural products, making them one of the most important food crops in the world. Beans are a great source of protein including other essential nutrients.

Unfortunately, there are a number of diseases that can affect bean plantations, resulting in reduced yields and poor-quality beans. some of the common disases of beans farm include Anthracnose, Bacterial Blight, Bean Rust, Bean Mosaic Virus, and Downy mildew.

That is why in this article, we will explore the 7 most common diseases of beans plantations and discuss ways to prevent and treat them.

We will also discuss methods of integrated pest management to control these diseases. With the right knowledge and techniques, you can maintain healthy bean plantations and increase yields.

7 Common Diseases of Beans Plantation and How to Treat

Numerous diseases threaten beans plantation, especially in terms of yield and quality of beans. Here are 7 common diseases of beans plantation that you are likely to encounter including how you can treat and control the diseases.

#1. Anthracnose

Category: Fungal Disease

Anthracnose is a fungal disease that affects bean plants. It is caused by several different types of fungi, most often Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

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The disease is characterized by dark spots and lesions on the leaves, stems, pods, and other parts of the plants. These spots can cause defoliation and result in significant yield losses.

Causes

Anthracnose is caused by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which is spread by splashing water and wind-blown rain. The fungus thrives in warm, humid conditions and can survive on infected plant debris in the soil.

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Symptoms

Symptoms of anthracnose on beans plants can include dark spots and lesions on the leaves and stems. The lesions may be circular or angular in shape and can range in size from small to large. The infected pods may also develop brown or black spots. The disease can cause defoliation and reduce yield.

Treatment

Chemical treatment of anthracnose in beans plants typically involves the application of fungicides such as mancozeb, chlorothalonil, and trifloxystrobin. For organic treatment, neem oil can be applied to the foliage and the soil.

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Prevention and Control

To prevent and control the spread of anthracnose, it is important to practice good sanitation and crop rotation. Remove and destroy any infected plants and debris and avoid overhead irrigation. Plant resistant varieties of beans and use mulches to reduce the amount of splashing water that can spread the fungus.

#2. Bacterial Blight

Category: Bacterial Blight

Bacterial blight disease is a severe disease of beans caused by the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli.

This disease affects the entire plant, including the leaves, stems, pods, and seeds. It is one of the most devastating diseases of beans and can cause total crop loss if not controlled.

Causes

Bacterial blight disease is caused by the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli. These bacteria is spread by wind, water, and equipment. The bacteria can also be spread by infected seeds and plant debris.

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Symptoms

The symptoms of bacterial blight disease include dark, water-soaked lesions on the leaves and stems. The lesions may have yellow halos around them. The pods and seeds may also be affected, with dark lesions and discoloration.

Treatment

Chemical control of bacterial blight disease includes the use of copper-based compounds and antibiotics.

Copper-based compounds such as copper sulfate, copper hydroxide, and copper oxychloride can be used to treat the disease.

Antibiotics such as streptomycin and tetracycline can also be used to control the disease.

Herbal treatments for bacterial blight disease include the use of neem oil and garlic extract.

Neem oil is a natural insecticide and fungicide that can be used to treat the disease. Garlic extract is also a natural fungicide that can be used to treat the disease.

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Prevention and Control

The best way to prevent and control bacterial blight disease is to practice good crop rotation and sanitation.

Crop rotation prevents the buildup of bacteria in the soil and helps reduce the chances of the disease spreading.

Sanitation includes removing and destroying infected plants and crop debris, using clean tools and equipment, and avoiding overhead irrigation. Planting disease-resistant varieties of beans can also help prevent the disease.

#3. Bean Rust

Category: Fungal Disease

Bean rust is a common fungal disease that affects different varieties of bean plants. It is caused by the fungus Uromyces appendiculatus and is characterized by reddish-brown spots that appear on the leaves of infected plants.

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The spots may eventually turn black, and the leaves will often drop off the plant prematurely.

Causes

Bean rust is primarily caused by environmental conditions such as high humidity, extended periods of wet weather, and poor air circulation.

The fungus can also be spread by water splashing onto the leaves of the plants, as well as contact with other infected plants.

Symptoms

The most common symptom of bean rust is small reddish-brown spots that appear on the leaves of the infected plants.

These spots may eventually turn black, and the leaves may drop prematurely. In severe cases, the fungus can also spread to the stems and pods of the plant, causing them to become distorted or discolored.

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Treatment

Chemical treatments are often used to treat bean rust, such as fungicides containing copper, chlorothalonil, or sulfur. For organic treatments, neem oil can be used to control the fungus.

Herbal remedies such as garlic tea, baking soda, and apple cider vinegar can also be used to help control the fungus.

Prevention and Control

The best way to prevent bean rust is to practice good garden hygiene. This includes removing any infected plants and debris from the garden and avoiding overhead watering.

Keeping the plants well-pruned and spaced out can also help improve air circulation and reduce the risk of infection.

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In addition, applying a fungicide to the plants before the disease appears can help prevent it from taking hold.

#4. Bean Mosaic Virus

Category: Viral Disease

Bean mosaic virus (BMV) is a common virus in bean plantations that can affect both leaves and pods of the plants. It is caused by a strain of the genus Potyvirus and is transmitted by aphids.

Causes

The virus is spread by aphids that feed on infected plants and then move to healthy plants, where they transmit the virus. It can also be spread through infected seeds and contaminated soil.

Symptoms

Symptoms of BMV include mottled leaves, stunted growth, distorted leaves, and yellowing of the leaves. There may also be a decrease in pod size and seed production.

Treatment

Chemical treatments for BMV include the use of insecticides, such as imidacloprid and dimethoate, to control aphid populations. Herbal treatments include using a mix of garlic and neem oil to prevent aphids from feeding on the plants.

Prevention and Control

To prevent and control BMV, you should practice crop rotation, plant only certified virus-free seeds, and control aphid populations.

You should also avoid working in the fields when plants are wet, as this can increase the spread of the virus.

Likewise, good sanitation practices, such as removing infected plants, should be practiced to reduce the spread of the virus.

#5. Downy mildew

Category: Fungal Disease

Downy mildew disease is a fungal disease that affects many different types of plants including beans.

It is caused by the pathogen Peronospora phaseoli, which is a type of oomycete. The disease is characterized by yellow spots on the leaves, yellowing of the plant, stunted growth, and white to grayish-purple fuzzy growth on the underside of the leaves.

Causes

The downy mildew disease is caused by the pathogen Peronospora phaseoli, which is a type of oomycete.

The spores of this fungus are spread through wind, water droplets, and splashing water from irrigation or rainfall.

The disease thrives in warm, humid environments and is most destructive when temperatures are between 60°F and 75°F.

Symptoms

The symptoms of downy mildew can vary depending on the type of plant, but generally include yellow spots on the leaves, yellowing of the plant, stunted growth, and white to grayish-purple fuzzy growth on the underside of the leaves.

Treatment

Chemical treatments for downy mildew include fungicides such as mancozeb, chlorothalonil, and copper sulfate. These should be applied as soon as symptoms are noticed.

Herbal treatments can also be used; some of the most commonly used herbs include garlic, neem oil, and rosemary.

Prevention and Control

To prevent and control downy mildew disease, it is important to practice good crop rotation, maintain adequate drainage, and avoid overhead irrigation. It is also important to remove any infected plants from the field as soon as possible. Spraying the crop with a fungicide at the first signs of infection can also help to prevent further spread.

#6. Fusarium wilt

Category: Fungal Disease

Fusarium wilt disease is a common fungal disease found in bean plantations. The disease is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, which infects the bean plants’ roots, causing them to become weak and eventually die. The disease is favored by warm, wet conditions and is most commonly found in humid climates.

Causes

The fungus Fusarium oxysporum is the primary cause of Fusarium wilt disease in bean plantations. The fungus enters the plants’ roots through wounds or natural openings and then multiplies, eventually blocking the flow of water and nutrients to the plant.

Symptoms

The symptoms of Fusarium wilt disease vary depending on the variety of bean plants affected. Generally, the leaves of infected plants will become yellow and wilted, and the roots will become stunted and discolored. In some cases, the entire plant may die.

Treatment

Chemical treatments for Fusarium wilt disease in bean plantations include fungicides such as mancozeb, chlorothalonil, and thiophanate-methyl. These fungicides can be applied to the surface of the soil or injected directly into the infected plants’ roots.

Herbal treatments for Fusarium wilt disease in bean plantations can include neem oil, garlic, and horsetail. Neem oil can be mixed with water and sprayed onto the plants’ leaves. Garlic can be chopped and added to the soil around the plant to help reduce the fungus’ growth.

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Horsetail can be brewed into tea and applied to the soil to help protect the roots from further infection.

Prevention and Control

Preventing and controlling Fusarium wilt disease in bean plantations can be done in several ways. It is important to practice crop rotation, as this will reduce the risk of the fungus spreading from one crop to another.

It is important to avoid overwatering the plants, as this can create ideal conditions for the fungus to grow. Lastly, using resistant varieties of beans is an effective way to reduce the risk of the disease.

#7. White Mold

Category: Fungal Disease

White Mold is a fungal disease that affects beans and other legumes. It is caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and is one of the most common diseases of beans in North America.

The disease is characterized by lesions that form on the stem, leaves, and pods of the plant, which can lead to dieback and reduced yields.

Causes

White Mold is caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The fungus can overwinter in the soil and can be spread through wind, water, and soil movement. The fungus thrives in damp and humid conditions and is most active in temperatures between 25-28°C (77-82°F).

Symptoms

The disease is characterized by the formation of white, cottony growths on the stems, leaves, and pods of the plant. These growths can cause the plant to wilt and die. The disease can also cause lesions on the stems and leaves of the plant which can lead to dieback.

Treatment

Chemical control of White Mold can be achieved with fungicides such as mancozeb, chlorothalonil, and thiophanate methyl. These fungicides should be applied when the disease first appears and should be repeated at 7–14-day intervals.

Herbal remedies for White Mold include using neem oil, garlic, onion, and hot pepper. These remedies should be applied to the affected areas and repeated at 7–14-day intervals.

Prevention and Control

Fungicides and herbal remedies should be applied before the disease appears, to prevent the spread of the infection. The use of crop rotation and proper drainage can also help to reduce the risk of White Mold infection.

Cultural practices such as crop rotation, proper irrigation and drainage, and the use of resistant varieties can help to reduce the risk of White Mold infection. Fungicides and herbal remedies should be used as a last resort, as they can be harmful to the environment.

Common Pests of Beans Plantation

Here are 5 common pests that infest beans plantation.

#1. Bean Leaf Beetle

Bean Leaf Beetle (BLB) is a common pest of beans grown in plantations and home gardens. It attacks the foliage of beans, reducing yields and causing unsightly damage to the plants.

The adult beetle is a small, light brown insect, about 3/16 inch long, with two dark stripes on each wing cover. The larvae are small, yellow-brown grubs, about 1/4 inch long.

Causes

The damage caused by BLB is caused by the adult beetles feeding on the bean foliage. This can cause considerable damage, reducing yields and making the plants unsightly.

Symptoms

Damage from BLB is visible on the leaves of the beans. Symptoms include leaf discoloration, wilting, and defoliation.

Treatment

Chemical treatments are available for controlling BLB. Examples include insecticides such as permethrin, acephate, and dimethoate.

For organic or herbal treatments, neem oil, garlic, and hot pepper can be used. These treatments should be applied directly to the foliage of the beans and repeated as needed.

Prevention and Control

To prevent and control BLB, it is important to keep the foliage of the bean plants free of weeds and debris.

This will help reduce the number of beetles in the area. In addition, keeping the plants well-watered and fertilized can help reduce the severity of the damage.

Crop rotation and hand-picking of the adult beetles can also help reduce BLB populations.

#2. Aphids

Aphids are small plant-sucking insects that can suck sap from the leaves and stems of beans, causing serious damage to beans plantations.

They feed on the sap of the plants, causing wilting, yellowing, and stunted growth. Aphids typically attack the leaves, stems, and flowers of young plants.

Causes

Aphids are usually spread by wind or through a variety of insects, including ladybugs, lacewings, and parasitic wasps.

Symptoms

Aphids cause yellowing of the leaves, stunted growth, and wilting of the plant. They can also cause a sticky substance known as honeydew to form on the leaves and branches of the plant.

Treatment

Chemical treatments for aphids include insecticides, such as pyrethrin and neem oil. Herbal treatments include garlic spray, tomato leaf spray, and hot pepper spray.

Insecticides should be applied to the entire plant, including the underside of the leaves. Herbal treatments should be sprayed directly onto the aphids.

Prevention and Control

To prevent and control aphids, you should practice crop rotation, use companion planting, introduce beneficial insects to the area, and avoid over-fertilizing their crops.

#3. Spider Mites

Spider mites in beans plantation are a major problem for you, as they can reduce yields and cause damage to the crop. Spider mites feed on the leaves of bean plants, causing yellow spots or stippling. They are especially active in warm and dry conditions.

Causes

Spider mites are usually spread by wind or other insects. They can also spread from nearby infested fields.

Symptoms

Damage to beans plants caused by spider mites includes yellow spots or stippling, webbing, and defoliation.

Treatment

An effective chemical treatment for spider mites in beans plantation is to use a miticide such as Spiromesifen. This should be applied to the crop at the first sign of damage.

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For an eco-friendlier approach to dealing with spider mites, you can use a herbal remedy such as neem oil. This should be applied as soon as possible to reduce the amount of damage caused by the mites.

The chemical or herbal treatment should be applied evenly across the crop, paying special attention to the underside of the leaves.

Prevention and Control

To prevent the spread of spider mites in beans plantations, you should monitor your fields regularly and take action at the first sign of an infestation. Good crop hygiene is also important to reduce the risk of infestations.

#4. Mexican Bean Beetle

Mexican Bean Beetle (MBB), an insect belonging to the family Coccinellidae, is a major pest of beans plantations.

It is native to Mexico but is found in many countries including the United States, Canada, and parts of Europe. MBB feeds on the leaves of bean plants, causing them to become distorted and discolored.

They also feed on the flowers and seed pods, resulting in reduced yields. MBB infestations can be identified by the presence of their larvae, which are small yellowish-orange oval-shaped insects that feed on the underside of the leaves.

Causes

Mexican Bean Beetle infestations are caused by the presence of adult beetles. They lay eggs on the underside of the leaves of the bean plants, which hatch into larvae and feed on the plant.

Symptoms

Symptoms of MBB infestations include distorted, discolored leaves and the presence of larvae on the underside of the leaves. The larvae cause further damage by feeding on the flowers and seed pods, resulting in reduced yields.

Treatment

Chemical treatment options for MBB infestations include the use of insecticides such as imidacloprid, spinosad, and pyrethrins. Herbal treatments can also be used to control MBB infestations.

Examples include neem oil, garlic spray, and hot pepper spray. These treatments should be applied directly to the plant and the surrounding area to kill the adult beetles and their larvae.

Prevention and Control

The best way to prevent and control MBB infestations is to practice good crop rotation, sanitation, and weed management. This will help to reduce the number of adult beetles and their larvae in the area.

The use of row covers or floating row covers can be used to protect plants from MBB infestations.

#5. Root-Knot Nematodes

Root-knot nematodes are parasitic roundworms that cause damage to bean plants. They feed on the roots of plants, causing knots or galls on the roots, which can interfere with water and nutrient uptake.

Causes

Root-knot nematodes are spread by soil particles, water, and other vectors. The nematodes can survive in the soil for many years, making it important to take measures to reduce their spread of them in bean fields.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a root-knot nematode infestation include yellowing of the leaves, stunted growth, and the presence of knots or galls on the roots.

Treatment

Chemical treatments are available to control root-knot nematodes in beans. These include nematicides, such as Temik, which are applied to the soil to kill the nematodes.

Herbal treatments can also be effective in controlling root-knot nematodes in beans. Examples of herbal treatments include neem oil, garlic, and horsetail. These can be applied to the soil or sprayed on the plants to repel or kill the nematodes.

The treatments should be applied according to the instructions on the label. Care should be taken to avoid contact with the eyes and skin when handling chemical treatments.

Prevention and Control

To prevent the spread of root-knot nematodes in beans, it is important to rotate crops, practice crop sanitation, and avoid unnecessary tillage. If an infestation is detected, it is important to treat the soil to kill any remaining nematodes.

Fungal Diseases Of Beans

Fungal diseases of beans include Anthracnose, White Mold, and Cercospora Leaf Spot. Anthracnose causes dark lesions on stems, pods, and leaves.

White Mold attacks the pods and leaves, causing them to collapse and turn white. Cercospora Leaf Spot causes yellow spots on the leaves, which eventually turn brown and drop off.

Bean Pests And Diseases

Bean pests and diseases can cause serious damage to crops, resulting in reduced yields and quality. Common pests include aphids, spider mites, whiteflies, and thrips.

Fungal diseases such as powdery mildew, bean rust, and anthracnose can also cause problems. Prevention and control methods include crop rotation, proper irrigation, and the use of natural predators, chemical insecticides, and fungicides.

Major Insect Pest Of Beans

Beans are vulnerable to several insect pests, including Mexican bean beetles, bean leaf beetles, Japanese beetles, grasshoppers, and black-eyed peas. These pests can damage the plant and reduce yields by causing defoliation, direct feeding damage, and the spread of disease. Cultural and chemical control methods can be used to manage these pests.

Beans Pests And Diseases Pdf

Beans pests and diseases pdf cover the various pests and diseases that can affect bean plants. It discusses the identification, prevention, and control of these pests and diseases, as well as the effects they can have on bean yields.

It also covers the importance of crop rotation and management practices in helping to reduce pest and disease problems.

French Bean Diseases

French beans are susceptible to a variety of diseases, including powdery mildew, halo blight, anthracnose, rust, bean mosaic virus, and bacterial brown spot.

Prevention is the best approach to managing these diseases and includes using disease-free seeds, crop rotation, and proper spacing and sanitation.

Common Bean Plant Problems

Common bean plant problems include nutrient deficiencies, pest infestations, and diseases such as blight and rust. Proper soil care, pest control, and disease prevention are important to ensure healthy bean plants.

Common Diseases Of Green Beans

Green beans are prone to a range of diseases, including anthracnose, angular leaf spot, bacterial blight, downy mildew, rust, and bacterial wilt.

These diseases can cause leaf discoloration, wilting, stunted growth, and root rot. Proper crop rotation and fungicide treatments can help prevent and control green bean diseases.

Common Bean Pests

Common bean pests include bean beetles, Mexican bean beetles, aphids, spider mites, and the bean weevil. These pests can cause damage to the leaves, pods, and seeds of beans, resulting in reduced yields.

Proper pest management strategies, such as crop rotation, insecticides, and beneficial insects, can help control bean pests.

Conclusion

Beans are susceptible to several common diseases, but with proper management and treatment, the risk of yield loss can be minimized. A combination of prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment can help keep beans healthy and productive.

Author: David

David is a Kenyan farmer from the rural village of Nairobi. Growing up, he was surrounded by the beauty of the Kenyan countryside, which sparked his passion for farming. After completing his education, he decided to pursue a career in agriculture and has since dedicated his life to providing food for his local community. David is an experienced farmer and is experienced in a range of agricultural practices, including crop rotation, animal husbandry and soil management. He is passionate about promoting sustainable agriculture and is actively working to reduce food insecurity in his community.

5 Replies to “7 Common Diseases Of Beans Plantation And How To Treat

  1. your information is the best one both for agricultural expert and farmers, so continue to share similar information.

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